Collection: Info Week 5

Typography

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Typography

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
"Typographer" redirects here. For the Typographer brand typewriter, see Typographer (typewriter).
Not to be confused with topography or typology (disambiguation).
In philately "typography", especially in the case of 19th century stamps, refers to letterpress printing.[1]
 
Specimen of Trajan typeface, based on the letter forms of capitalis monumentalis or Roman square capitals, as used for the inscription at the base of Trajan's Column from which the typeface takes its name

Typography (from the Greek words τύπος typos "form" and γράφειν graphein "to write") is the art and technique of arranging type to make written language most appealing to learning and recognition. The arrangement of type involves selecting typefacespoint sizeline length, line-spacing (leading), letter-spacing (tracking), and adjusting the space within letters pairs (kerning[2]). Type design is a closely related craft, sometimes considered part of typography; most typographers do not design typefaces, and some type designers do not consider themselves typographers.[3][4] In modern times, typography has been put in film, television and online broadcasts to add emotion to communication.[5]

Typography is performed by typesetterscompositors, typographers, graphic designersart directorsmanga artists,comic book artistsgraffiti artistsclerical workers, and everyone else who arranges type for a product. Until theDigital Age, typography was a specialized occupation. Digitization opened up typography to new generations of visual designers and lay users, and David Jury, Head of Graphic Design at Colchester Institute in England, states that "typography is now something everybody does."[6]

 

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